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"Selador Showcase: The Eighth Wonder Pt 1"

Label: Selador

2019 Mar 15     
2 Bit Thugs

Label boss Steve Parry heads a heavy-hitting line-up and also provides a minimix featuring all five tracks from the EP

The Eighth Wonder is positively overflowing with international flavours: from Berlin to Buenos Aires via Spain, Canada, Italy, Holland and more on this five-track EP. If you buy all five tracks, you can also get it in a mixed format with the tracks deftly segued together by label boss Steve Parry.

Mr Parry is also the first featured artist, with his track Michelada being the opener. A kick-and-throbbing-synth intro is joined by a clap and builds into a smooth pulsating track that washes over your synapses as Parry keeps adding layer upon layer of sound. The second track is Bonzai Tiger by James Teej, which starts with a hollow kick and hi-hat then adds first electrically generated birdsong, and then what sounds like a synth line put through a sweeping filter so it keeps morphing and getting more intense as the track progresses. It's a great lead and is backed by a one-note orchestral string line. 

Next up is Joris Biesmans with Menneke, another mellow techno masterpiece with plenty of bleeps in play throughout, and that's followed by Azumi from Collective States, which begins with a rumbling sound and a nifty 303 line and features a great vocal sample which repeats over and over as the acid line twists and turns in the forefront of the mix. Finally you have Tumbling Fields with Supa Somali, which also is a bit of a bleep-fest and keeps building with intricate layers of sound and sung vocal lines.

This release is what I can best describe as intelligent techno: each track is musical yet thought-provoking, so it works on many levels. I don’t have a favourite as all five are pretty sublime, which is why this release comes highly recommended.

Words: Danny Slade

Release date: 15 March
 

 

 

Review Score: 8

 

 

 

Tags: Selador, Steve Parry, James Teej, Joris Biesmans, Collective States, Tumbling Fields